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Wetland Yarns – Uniting Science and Culture

Plants and wildlife of Lake Mealup captured in a three panel by students at Greenfields Primary

Plants and wildlife of Lake Mealup captured in a three panel by students at Greenfields Primary

Greenfields Primary School recently took part in an excursion to learn about the cultural and scientific importance of two wetland sites in the Peel-Yalgorup System. The “Wetland Yarns” project brought together Noongar Elders, scientists, educators and artists, all sharing their knowledge and stories with students about the value of our wetland system. Students worked with a local artist to capture the experience in a large painting.

The “Wetland Yarns” project educates students about local culture and the Peel-Yalgorup System while outside in the wetland environment. Students develop a deeper connection with their local wetlands and an appreciation of relationships between people and the land. They also learnt about the importance of environmental responsibility and how they can play a role in conserving and protecting our wetlands.

Peel-Harvey Catchment Council programs aim to communicate how we are all part of a living eco-system and everything is connected. PHCC also teaches the community what makes these waterways so scientifically unique and the ways in which we can all help conserve and protect our waterways.

The Wetland Yarns project is one of the first actions of the recently launched ‘Wetlands and People Plan’. One of the plan’s goals is to Increase the community’s capacity to protect wetlands. This is being done in a number of ways, including sharing stories of our wetlands.

Fifty two Year 3 students from Greenfields Primary School participated in the June Wetland Yarns project. The excursion included a visit on country to two wetland sites at the Peel-Yalgorup System; Lake Mealup and Lake Clifton.

The day was led by local Noongar Aboriginal Elders and community leaders with a moving Welcome to Country from Noongar Elder, Harry Nannup. Community leader, George Walley, engaged the students with cultural story-telling and cultural knowledge of the area. George shared Noongar language with the students, teaching traditional names for plants and animals and speaking about the cultural significance of the land.

Peel-Harvey Catchment Council Science Advisor, Steve Fisher, shared with students his knowledge of conservation and the environmental importance of the lakes. Steve’s time with the students reflected his love of the Peel-Harvey environment and how each person’s actions can help to improve the health of the Peel-Harvey waterways.

Sharon Meredith, a PHCC Wetlands and People Officer, facilitated the excursion in conjunction with the Greenfields Primary School principal, Shannon Wright and the Primary School Educator, Leanne Walley making the day a memorable and unique experience for all participants.

Two weeks after the wetland excursion an artist visited Greenfields Primary School to lead students in the creation of a large painting depicting the experience. Angela Rossen is a renowned local artist with special interests in conservation and sustainability projects with schools and community groups. Angela worked with the students over four days to create the artwork which conveys a wetland setting of Lake Mealup and the plants and animals that live in that environment.

The artwork aims to unite the message of science and culture by representing the biodiversity and cultural importance of the wetland through art.  In addition to the wetland excursion the students gained skills in observational drawing, painting and working collaboratively.

The finished artwork is accompanied by a panel depicting the Noongar names for the plants and animals. George Walley assisted in providing the Noongar language translations for the panel. The picture will be displayed at the Greenfields Primary School.

Andy Gulliver, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council Chair, commented on the success of the Wetland Yarns project; “It is a pleasure to collaborate with Greenfields Primary and the Noongar community to create this ‘hands on’ educational experience. We hope this experience leaves a long lasting impression for the students involved and for future students. The artwork is one way to keep that experience alive at the school and continue to pass on the cultural and environmental message to others. This has been a pilot project and we will support similar projects for other schools into the future.”

The artwork is to be officially presented to the Greenfields Primary School on the 17th of November by The Hon. Andrew Hastie, Federal Member for Canning, Mayor Williams from the City of Mandurah and Andy Gulliver, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council Chairman.

This project is supported by the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Program, Western Australian Government’s State NRM Program and City of Mandurah.

ENDS

Media Contact:  Jane O’Malley, Chief Executive Officer, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, Jane.Omalley@peel-harvey.org.au, (08) 6369 8800

We acknowledge the Noongar people as Traditional Custodians of this land and pay our respects to all Elders past and present

Lake Clifton to benefit from new Land for Wildlife project

PHCC’s Jesse Rowley, Jordon Garbellini and Jo Garvey

PHCC’s Jesse Rowley, Jordon Garbellini and Jo Garvey

The City of Mandurah has committed funding to the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council for a part-time Land for Wildlife officer to help landowners manage wildlife habitat in the Lake Clifton catchment, across Mandurah and Waroona. The Shire of Waroona has also contributed funds to boost the project within its first year.

Land for Wildlife is a long-running voluntary scheme which encourages and assists property owners to include nature conservation with other land management practices. Changes to the WA state funding structure means Land for Wildlife is now being delivered by each of the 7 NRM Regions across WA.

Thanks to funding from the City of Mandurah and the Shire of Waroona, the PHCC Land for Wildlife officer will assist landholders to develop personalised plans for their property helping to integrate nature conservation with current land use practice with flow on benefits to Lake Clifton.

Lake Clifton is one of the most valuable environmental assets of the City of Mandurah and broader Peel region. The lake is part of the Peel-Yalgorup Ramsar Site, a wetland of international significance. It provides habitat for numerous migratory and resident shorebird species and is also home to a 15 km reef of Thrombolites. The Lake Clifton Thrombolites attract over 250,000 visitors a year. This federally protected microbial colony of calcareous rock-like structures are thought to be more than 2000 years old.

Lake Clifton is a fragile environment under threat from a changing climate and certain land management practices within the broader catchment. This poses a questionable future for the environmental value of the lake itself. The health of Lake Clifton is inextricably connected to the management of land and water in its catchment.

This property owner stewardship project has been designed by City of Mandurah officers and the Peel Harvey Catchment Council to help address these issues. The Land for Wildlife project will inform, enthuse and support landholders to undertake land management practices aimed at improving wildlife habitat on their property and improving the condition of the lake’s catchment. The ultimate aim is to restore habitats in the lake’s catchment and improve the lake’s water quality and ecosystem functions.

Over the next 5 years, the PHCCs Land for Wildlife officer will undertake site assessments and invite participating landowners to enter into voluntary management agreements. Those that do enter into VMA’s will have access to grant funding for nature conservation projects (subject to future funding).

The Land for Wildlife officer will offer advice, such as:

  • how to integrate wildlife habitat with other uses of private land
  • how to manage remnant bushland and the area’s wildlife
  • the ecological role and requirements of native plants and animals
  • how to include wildlife aspects into revegetation schemes and landcare
  • information about other assistance and incentives that are available

PHCC is already fielding expressions of interest and anticipates high participant numbers upon project commencement. PHCC will continue to work with the City of Mandurah and Shire of Waroona on a range of community engagement activities such as workshops and field days to promote the benefits of the Land for Wildlife project and its value to the health of Lake Clifton.

For more information please visit the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council website at http://peel-harvey.org.au/

 

ENDS

Media Contact:  Jane O’Malley, Chief Executive Officer, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, Jane.Omalley@peel-harvey.org.au, (08) 6369 8800

 

We acknowledge the Noongar people as Traditional Custodians of this land and pay our respects to all Elders past and present

An Australian First in Wetland Action Planning

The Peel-Harvey Catchment Council is set to launch Australia’s first CEPA Action Plan (Wetlands and People Plan) for a Ramsar-listed site.  The plan will promote communication, education, participation and awareness of the Peel-Yalgorup Wetland System and has involved consultation with a myriad of community stakeholders.

The Ramsar Site 482 wetlands, including the Peel-Harvey Estuary, Lake Clifton, Lake Mealup and the lands and lakes of Yalgorup National Park, are recognised as wetlands of international significance under the Ramsar Convention for their outstanding environmental, social and economic values.

In developing the plan, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council convened an expert panel of representatives from government, tourism, education, marketing, environment, planning and community.  Extensive consultation occurred during the process to ensure stakeholders have contributed to, and understand their responsibilities in implementing the plan.

The Wetlands and People Plan for the Peel-Yalgorup System (PYS) has been developed to encourage government, community and industry to become even more involved in the care and management of the Peel‑Yalgorup Wetlands System which face many threats. The Plan recommends actions to raise awareness of the Peel-Yalgorup’s values and is targeted at three main groups:

  • people who use the wetlands,
  • those with businesses which benefit from the wetlands, and
  • those who make decisions which affect the wetlands.

These groups include both local users and visitors and the draft plan reached out to local and state government, recreational groups, businesses, community groups, schools and the general public to generate programs that raise awareness of wetland values and functions.

The official launch of the Wetlands and People Plan will be held on the 1st November.

The Plan reflects the business, social, and environmental interests of stakeholders and beneficiaries with special consideration given to local context, culture and traditions. A copy of the Plan will be distributed to all stakeholders that have a role in meeting the goals of the Wetlands and People Plan.

“We are proud to have Australia’s first site-specific ‘Wetlands and People Plan’ ready for action. It will guide education and promote programs to increase people’s understanding and appreciation of the fantastic wetlands on our doorstep.  It will inform and influence government and politicians to make decisions that will provide for better protection and management,” said Andy Gulliver, PHCC Chairman.

The Wetlands and People Plan was prepared by Peel-Harvey Catchment Council through funding from Lotterywest, with support from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Program.

ENDS

Media Contact:  Jane O’Malley, Chief Executive Officer, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, Jane.Omalley@peel-harvey.org.au, (08) 6369 8800

 

We acknowledge the Noongar people as Traditional Custodians of this land and pay our respects to all Elders past and present

 

Alcoa Foundation partners on three Peel-Harvey projects

Three rivers, three projects and one mighty contribution from Alcoa Foundation
Elder Harry Nannup conducting a Smoking Ceremony to bless works on the Serpentine River

Elder Harry Nannup conducting a Smoking Ceremony to bless works on the Serpentine River

Alcoa Foundation has announced funding of more than $2 million for three environmental projects across the Peel-Harvey Catchment. The partnerships with Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, Greening Australia and The Nature Conservancy will help deliver on-ground and in-water environmental actions in consultation with the community, to improve the health of the Peel-Harvey Catchment over three years.

The projects, which commence in 2017, will contribute directly to the on-going health and management of the Peel-Yalgorup Ramsar System. The 26,500 hectare wetland system, including the Peel-Harvey Estuary, is recognised as a wetland of international significance under the Ramsar Convention (Ramsar Site 482).

There are a number of threats impacting on the rivers and wetlands of the Peel-Harvey including land clearing and agricultural land use, urban development, recreational land use and climate change.

The three separate but complementary projects will enhance existing ventures and boost new initiatives to protect and improve the condition of the three major rivers that discharge in to the Peel-Harvey estuarine system – the Murray, Serpentine and Harvey rivers – and the Peel-Yalgorup Ramsar System.

Peel-Harvey Catchment Council – ‘Connecting Corridors and Communities – Restoring the Serpentine River’

The Peel-Harvey Catchment Council (PHCC) will deliver on-ground environmental actions and community engagement over three years to improve the health of the Serpentine (Bilya) River. The funding will complement other projects including the State Government funded Regional Estuaries Initiative and Transform Peel, by enabling further works on private land, including:

  • Community engagement events and field days
  • Fencing to protect and conserve existing areas of riparian and bushland vegetation
  • Revegetation to reconnect areas of bushland, riparian zones and patches of remnant vegetation
  • Bank stabilisation to improve water quality, habitat and food availability for invertebrates and finfish
  • Biosecurity management of feral animals, weeds and diseases
  • Working with our local Noongar community through all aspects of the project
  • Developing an River Action Plan for the mid and upper reaches of the Serpentine River

Greening Australia – The Three Rivers Initiative

Greening Australia will implement local, on-ground action across the Peel region working on identified priority projects with industry, community and local land management groups to improve the condition of the Serpentine, Murray and Harvey rivers, reverse the loss of habitat for threatened species and integrate priority restoration into Peel-Harvey’s fragmented landscape.

The Nature Conservancy – revitalising the Peel-Harvey Estuary through nature-based solutions

Addressing the growing threats of urban development, fisheries decline and climate change on the long-term health and resilience of the Peel-Harvey Estuary, this project will complement existing work undertaken in the upper catchment. It will focus on marine habitat restoration opportunities for improving fisheries, biodiversity and natural solutions to coastal defence in the estuary.  The project will use The Nature Conservancy’s proven approach for catalysing large-scale investments in estuary protection and repair as being carried out in Oyster Harbour near Albany, and in South Australia and Victoria.

The project will also gather existing environmental, social and economic data to inform the development of online restoration decision-support tools called Coastal Resilience and Conservation Action Planning (CAP) processes to assist with restoration priority setting.

Look out in your local community for upcoming activities and citizen science projects from these organisations to participate in recovery actions for the three rivers and the Peel-Yalgorup Ramsar System.

 Quotes attributable to Alcoa of Australia Managing Director Michael Parker:

 “Alcoa is delighted to be working with three highly respected environmental organisations to support the  Serpentine, Murray and Harvey rivers which are not only environmentally significant, but make important contributions to the social and economic health of the region.”

These new partnerships are very clearly focussed on improved environmental outcomes for the Peel-Harvey Catchment and reflect Alcoa’s commitment to returning value to the communities where we operate.”

Quotes attributable to PHCC Chairman Andy Gulliver:

 “We are excited about this funding announcement. This significant grant enables three organisations to continue work on projects across the Peel-Harvey Catchment and PHCC is proud to be a part of the collaboration. It’s a great acknowledgement of the Peel-Harvey region and its environmental significance.”

“The PHCC’s Restoring the Serpentine River project will benefit from the funding boost to continue and expand work with the community, the local Noongar people and local landholders to preserve and protect the Peel-Harvey estuary and surrounding landscapes for future generations.”

Quotes attributable to Greening Australia CEO Brendan Foran:

Greening Australia is 35 years old this year and we have also been in a continuous partnership with Alcoa for the entire 35 years. The Three Rivers initiative presents a renewed partnership opportunity to extend our collaboration and to improve the condition of the three major rivers in the Peel-Harvey, the Murray, Serpentine and Harvey.’

 Quotes attributable to The Nature Conservancy Australia Marine Manager Dr Chris Gillies:

“We will hold a series of public presentations and workshops with leading TNC international experts and local stakeholders to improve knowledge of the benefits and approaches to restoring marine habitats.”

“This will include the latest local and global natural restoration methods for improving fisheries, reducing nutrient runoff and protecting shorelines against sea level rise and flooding.

ENDS

Media Contact:  Jane O’Malley, Chief Executive Officer, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, Jane.Omalley@peel-harvey.org.au, (08) 6369 8800

For further information about:

We acknowledge the Noongar people as Traditional Custodians of this land and pay our respects to all Elders past and present

People, Plants and ….Pancakes!

PHCC Pancake Breakfast, Planting Demonstration and Seedling Give-away at Lake Clifton

PHCC Pancake Breakfast, Planting Demonstration and Seedling Give-away at Lake Clifton

In a positive step towards re-engaging the Lake Clifton and Herron community, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council (PHCC) recently hosted a planting demonstration, pancake breakfast and seedling give-away at the Lake Clifton Herron Community Hall. Over 100 local residents turned out on a cold, Sunday morning to collect seedlings, eat pancakes and to share an affinity yarn with their neighbours.

Lake Clifton and Herron are adjacent to Yalgorup National Park.  The Park is a 12,888ha area of coastal land that includes Lake Clifton, Lake Preston and several other significant freshwater and saline lakes. The Yalgorup Lakes System is part of a site listed under the international Ramsar Convention on Wetlands protecting “Wetlands of International Significance”.

The Thrombolites of Lake Clifton represent some of the earliest forms of life on earth and are thought to be over 2000 years old. The Thrombolites are protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation (EPBC) Act and are listed as critically endangered. These “living rocks” grow less than 1mm a year and are built by photosynthesising micro-organisms whose limestone emissions create the dome structure of the Thrombolites.  The health of the Thrombolites is under threat with the salinity of the lake increasing and the seedling give-away is just one of many steps towards trying to improve the health of the Lake Clifton area.

For this seedling give-away morning, the Lake Clifton and Herron community were joined by PHCC board member, Paddi Creevey, PHCC staff and volunteers along with Jenny Rose from the Lake Clifton Herron Landcare Group who was thrilled with the community’s enthusiasm and sheer number of people who weathered the wintery morning.

1700 seedlings, with tree guards, were given to community members on the day and a pancake breakfast provided the community with a warm welcome on such a cold morning. Local business owner Wayne Goring from Arboreal Tree Care made a generous contribution and provided 40 landowners with a free load of mulch to give the seedlings a greater chance of surviving.

Feedback from the day showed that the Lake Clifton/Herron community thought the event was very well planned and they appreciated the opportunity to network with their neighbours.  One participant said “Very informative.  Great to see a community come together. (It) has been wonderful”.

The attendance of over 100 residents and landowners reflects the Lake Clifton and Herron community’s widespread interest in protecting the environment and their willingness to act now for the benefit of future generations.

By reconnecting with the community and distributing seedlings, PHCC hope to share the message of the importance of protecting not only the Thrombolites but the surrounding landscape as well.

This project is supported by the PHCC through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.

ENDS

Media Contact:  Jane O’Malley, Chief Executive Officer, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, Jane.Omalley@peel-harvey.org.au, (08) 6369 8800

 

We acknowledge the Noongar people as Traditional Custodians of this land and pay our respects to all Elders past and present

Waste Reduction Community Dinner

Youth on Leadership Group serving waste reduction dinner

Youth on Leadership Group serving waste reduction dinner

Peel-Harvey Catchment Council is partnering with The Makers to help deliver the first six months of The Makers’ Youth on Leadership Program. The Youth on Leadership Program will take on the theme of “Reducing Plastics in our Waterways”, empowering participants to design a campaign on ‘Reducing the use of single use plastics.’’

The annual program began this July with a six day leadership camp at Bickley Outdoor Recreation Camp. During the camp the leadership group was involved in interactive presentations and activities about the impacts of plastics in waterways and ways the group can empower themselves to take action.

There are 34 participants in The Makers’ Youth on Leadership program as well as 6 youth mentors.

During the camp the leadership group was set the challenge to create a Waste-Reduction Community Dinner.

The idea for a Waste-Reduction Community Dinner came about through the partnership with Peel-Harvey Catchment Council and The Makers.  It was identified as a way to raise awareness of the negative impacts of plastics and also as a great way to allow the Youth on Leadership group to put into action the new skills and knowledge gained at the Bickley camp. The group was issued the challenge to minimise plastic use for the camp dinner.

Sam Culbertson and Cara Williams from the Waste Authority provided activities for the group at the Bickley Camp that demonstrated different ways plastics can be eliminated from daily life.

The Waste-Reduction Community Dinner was held on the 7th July at the Billy Dower Centre in Mandurah.    92 people were invited to the dinner and were served an inspirational three course meal of bruschetta, vegetarian curry and apple strudel. Afterwards PHCC were responsible for composting the food scraps.

Some simple tips that help in reducing waste and plastics at home are:

  • Plan your meal so you purchase as close to exact amounts that you need
  • Create bins for compost and recyclables
  • Visit your local butcher and grocers and buy produce that isn’t wrapped in plastic
  • Avoid plastic bags; bring your own container and reusable bags when shopping
  • Always look for alternatives to buying items wrapped in plastic; buy items in re-useable packaging
  • Audit the plastic and waste that you create at the end of the meal and challenge yourself to do better next time

Andy Gulliver from PHCC said “We are thrilled to partner with The Makers for the Youth on Leadership program for the next six months. We believe in the importance of providing opportunities for youth to make their voice heard and take action on community issues they are passionate about. The Waste Reduction community dinner is just the start of the journey and we look forward to seeing and hearing about what this inspiring group creates over the course of the program.”

Supplies for the dinner were kindly donated by The Spudshed, The Glass Jar and Woolworths.

This project is supported by the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council through funding from the Western Australian Government’s State NRM Program.

 

ENDS

Media Contact:  Jane O’Malley, Chief Executive Officer, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, Jane.Omalley@peel-harvey.org.au, (08) 6369 8800

State Funding to Boost Peel-Yalgorup Ramsar Project

L-R: Paddi Creevey, Andy Gulliver, Bob Pond, Hon David Templeman MLA, Steve Fisher, Robyn Clarke MLA, Michael Schultz, Jordon Garbellini, Thelma Crook, Kelvin Barr

L-R: Paddi Creevey, Andy Gulliver, Bob Pond, Hon David Templeman MLA, Steve Fisher, Robyn Clarke MLA, Michael Schultz, Jordon Garbellini, Thelma Crook, Kelvin Barr

The Peel-Harvey Catchment Council has been successful in securing $20,000 through the state Government’s new Local Projects, Local Jobs Program. This funding, allocated through the Peel Development Commission, will contribute to a larger PHCC project of international importance.

The McGowan Government has delivered on its election promise to fund Peel-Harvey Catchment Council on projects in catchment management.  A recent announcement to commit funds for the Local Projects, Local Jobs Program will provide a much needed boost to the Peel-Yalgorup “Saltmarshes of Ramsar 482: Understanding our Peel-Yalgorup Ramsar Values project.

The 26,500 hectare Peel-Yalgorup wetland system, including the estuary and lakes in the Yalgorup National Park, are wetlands of international importance under the Ramsar Convention. The saltmarshes of this system are also a federally-listed threatened ecological community (TEC).  It is important to monitor these features of the wetlands to protect them for future generations to enjoy.

Saltmarshes play a critical role in food webs and contain many different types of plants and animals including crustaceans, molluscs, worms and insects that form an important part of the diet of birds including species that migrate from the northern hemisphere during our summer.  Vegetation around the saltmarshes also provide important habitat for these birds and other native fauna.

This additional funding will enable botanical surveys at 18 sites throughout the wetland system, measuring the extent and composition of vegetation, with a focus on saltmarshes, using aerial monitoring and ground-truthing. This work will build on a preliminary survey by PHCC funded by the Australian Government though the National Landcare Program. The field-based botanical surveys will commence in October 2017. Results from the survey will be available as a final report through the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council.

The PHCC will deliver this project and share the report with federal, state and local Government departments as well as the Peel-Yalgorup System Ramsar Technical Advisory Group. The results of the project will also be communicated to the local community through field days and workshops.

According to the Chairperson of PHCC, Andy Gulliver “The funds will enable a more detailed assessment of the  saltmarshes and other vegetation in the Ramsar site and give us a benchmark against which we can measure how we are doing in protecting these irreplaceable natural assets.”

The Peel-Harvey Catchment Council would like to acknowledge that funding for this project was made possible through the Peel Development Commission, the Australian Government and the Government of Western Australia.

ENDS

Media Contact:  Jane O’Malley, Chief Executive Officer, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, Jane.Omalley@peel-harvey.org.au, (08) 6369 8800

 

We acknowledge the Noongar people as Traditional Custodians of this land and pay our respects to all Elders past and present

Fighting Feral Animals in our Upper Catchment

Threatened Species Commissioner, Gregory Andrews with PHCC’s Darralyn Ebsary at the Farmers 4 Fauna Launch

Threatened Species Commissioner, Gregory Andrews with PHCC’s Darralyn Ebsary at the Farmers 4 Fauna Launch

The Peel-Harvey Catchment Council (PHCC) was excited to host Australia’s first Threatened Species Commissioner, Gregory Andrews to launch two new exciting projects in our upper catchment.

The two projects focus on feral animal control, specifically feral cats. To date feral cats endanger at least 142 native species, more than one third of our threatened mammals, reptiles, frogs and birds.

Included in this list are two small iconic Western Australian mammals, the numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus) and the woylie (Bettongia penicillata ogilbyi). Both of these species are listed as endangered with the proposed Dryandra Woodland National Park being home to one of the few remaining natural populations of both species.

Department of Parks and Wildlife are continuing work to help restore and maintain healthy populations of numbats and woylies within Dryandra Woodland through building a new predator proof compound and programs such as Western Shield, along with other initiatives. Adjacent landholders are also working with the department, and now the PHCC to undertake feral animal control on their properties, which helps to give these endangered species a fighting chance.

In recognition of this and in an effort to complement the efforts of Parks and Wildlife, in April 2017 the PHCC confirmed their support of two projects which focus on feral cat and fox control on land close to and surrounding the Dryandra Woodland.

The first project, Farmers 4 Fauna, focuses on supporting private landholders neighbouring Dryandra. On the 6th of April over 30 landholders, local and state Government partners and the Threatened Species Commissioner gathered at Barna Mia Animal Sanctuary to learn more about the project and engage with the presenters from DAFWA, Parks and Wildlife, Project Numbat and PHCC.

The second project involves a partnership with the Shire of Cuballing to manage feral cat monitoring and removal at Popanyinning Waste Disposal Site. This project was launched on site the same day with Mr Andrews, Shire of Cuballing CEO and Councillors, WA Feral Animal Management representatives and PHCC representatives.

PHCC Chairman Andy Gulliver said – “The PHCC was delighted to have the Threatened Species Commissioner come to WA to launch these exciting projects. Feral cats have such a significant impact on our native wildlife, and also detrimentally affect agricultural productivity so it was an easy decision to support these initiatives.  We look forward to working with our project partners and landholders to help save some of our most iconic native marsupials that we are so fortunate to have in our catchment, and we want to ensure that our children and grandchildren still have the chance to see our treasured furry friends in the wild”.

These projects are supported by the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.

ENDS

Media Contact:  Jane O’Malley, Chief Executive Officer, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, Jane.Omalley@peel-harvey.org.au, (08) 6369 8800

 

We acknowledge the Noongar people as Traditional Custodians of this land and pay our respects to all Elders past and present

Community Environment Grants Announced

Volunteers Jo Garvey, Bayden Smith and others planting at Bindjareb Park

Volunteers Jo Garvey, Bayden Smith and others planting at Bindjareb Park

Following the success of the 2015 Community Environment grants project, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council is pleased to announce Round 2 of funding opportunities for individual grants of up to $50,000.

Community Environment Grants are funded through the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme to support local communities with projects that protect and enhance natural assets in the Peel-Harvey Catchment.

Community groups and individuals are encouraged to submit applications for funding for on-ground activities that maintain or enhance threatened species habitat, threatened ecological communities, migratory species, regionally significant species habitat (or communities) or the ecological character of the Peel-Yalgorup Ramsar site.

Priority funding will be given to individuals and groups to undertake activities to protect these areas through fencing, weed control and feral animal control.

All activities must be undertaken within the Peel-Harvey Catchment and be completed by March 30 2018.

To discuss a proposal please contact Jo Garvey on 6369 8800 or email jo.garvey@peel-harvey.org.au

ENDS

Media Contact:  Jane O’Malley, Chief Executive Officer, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, Jane.Omalley@peel-harvey.org.au, (08) 6369 8800

 

We acknowledge the Noongar people as Traditional Custodians of this land and pay our respects to all Elders past and present

“Inspiring” wetlands group meets for the 11th year running

Members of the Ramsar Technical Advisory Group

Members of the Ramsar Technical Advisory Group

Members of the Peel-Yalgorup System Ramsar Technical Advisory Group came together recently for their annual meeting. The dedicated wetlands group enters its 11th year with members full of enthusiasm and a broad range of initiatives underway.

The 26,500 hectare Peel-Yalgorup wetland system, including the estuary and lakes in the Yalgorup National Park, are designated wetlands of international importance under the Ramsar Convention. Topics discussed at the annual meeting related to the management and monitoring of this complex and significant site.

The Peel-Yalgorup System Ramsar Technical Advisory Group (TAG) was established in 2007 and involves 27 stakeholder organisations who work collaboratively to manage this wetland system.

Senior Bindjareb Elder Harry Nannup opened the meeting by welcoming the group to Noongar country. Mr Nannup emphasised how keen he is to work with the TAG members on matters relating to the estuary and wetlands.

Presentations were made by TAG members on planning, on-ground works and monitoring activities across the Peel-Yalgorup wetland system. Key projects discussed at the meeting included:

  • the Lake McLarty Action Plan,
  • ongoing recovery actions at Lake Mealup,
  • Austin Bay and Roberts Bay Reserves on-ground works,
  • increasing salinity of Lake Clifton and implications for the Thrombolite Recovery Group,
  • the Regional Estuaries Initiative,
  • the Marine Stewardship Council’s accreditation of the estuary’s commercial and recreational fishery,
  • annual Shorebird 2020 report on waterbird numbers and
  • the new Wetlands and People project.

Dr Fiona Valesini, from Murdoch University, presented on the Australian Research Council Linkage project; balancing estuarine and societal health in a changing environment. Dr Valesini has said the research would help to deliver the types of benefits the growing population in the area needs and wants while minimising the downstream effects on the natural assets provided by the estuary, like good water quality and fishing.

Dr Rhonda Butcher from Water’s Edge Consulting explained the Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Framework, for which the Peel-Yalgorup System has been chosen as a case study. Dr Butcher is considered a leader in Australian Ramsar site management having led major programs across all Australian Ramsar sites over the past 17 years.

The meeting concluded with a special mention from Dr Butcher, “This TAG is very different to many others I have worked with. The ongoing, highly collaborative approach is very progressive. The work you are doing is inspiring and it is awesome that you have a CEPA (Communication, Education and Awareness) Plan- the only one I know of for an individual site”.

To view a new information sheet about the Peel-Yalgorup System, its management objectives and Ramsar convention information visit the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council website: http://peel-harvey.org.au/wp-content/uploads/Ramsar-482-TAG-Info-Sheet.pdf.

The Peel-Harvey Catchment Council facilitates the meetings held in March each year. The Peel-Yalgorup System Ramsar 482 TAG is supported by the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council through funding from the Australian Government’ s National Landcare Programme.

ENDS

Media Contact:  Jane O’Malley, Chief Executive Officer, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, Jane.Omalley@peel-harvey.org.au, (08) 6369 8800

 

We acknowledge the Noongar people as Traditional Custodians of this land and pay our respects to all Elders past and present

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2012 Western Australian Environment Awards Winner