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Wetlands and People Plan Launch – Celebrating Wise Use of our Wetlands

5 December 2017…On November 1st the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council officially launched Australia’s first CEPA Action Plan for a Ramsar-listed site.  The Peel-Yalgorup SystemWetlands and People Plan’ is a CEPA Action Plan for our wetland system, including our iconic Peel-Harvey Estuary.  The Wetlands and People Plan is a significant step towards “wise use” of our waterways, which are the basis of the economy of the Peel Region, and so valued by our community and visitors.

The Ramsar Site 482 wetlands, including the Peel-Harvey Estuary, Lakes Clifton, Preston, Mealup and McLarty and numerous other water bodies near the Estuary and coast are recognised as wetlands of international significance under the Ramsar Convention for their outstanding environmental, social and economic values. At the centre of the Ramsar philosophy is the “wise use” of wetlands; the conservation and sustainable use of wetlands and all the services they provide, for the benefit of people and nature.

The Wetlands and People Plan is for those who use the wetlands, those with businesses which benefit from the wetlands, and those who make decisions which affect the wetlands. The Plan applies communication, capacity building, education, participation and awareness approaches to better manage and protect the Peel-Yalgorup Wetland System.

Supported by funds from Lotterywest and led by PHCC Project Manager Thelma Crook, the Plan was developed with the support of an expert panel from a range of backgrounds including tourism, planning, local government, social sciences, youth, biodiversity and culture. Extensive consultation during development stages ensured stakeholders contributed to, and understood their roles in implementing the Plan for this complex wetland system.

In opening proceedings at the launch of the Plan, local Noongar Elder Harry Nannup led a moving Welcome to Country, “Welcome to my country, it’s a beautiful country. We work with the right people for this place; these are the right people”.

Stakeholder groups who are identified, and have agreed to play active roles in implementing the plan were well represented by nearly 50 attendees at the launch on the Dawesville foreshore of the Harvey estuary. Guests included some expert panel members in Paddi Creevey, Mayor Rhys Williams, Jan Star and Garry Middle. Mandurah Deputy Mayor Caroline Knight, Shire of Murray CEO Dean Unsworth and Councillor Steve Lee, Professor Pierre Horwitz, Bird Life Australia member Bill Russell, Hillary Wheater from FRAGYLE and Barry Small from Canoe Trails Friends also attended. Eric Lumsden, Chairman of the Western Australian Planning Commission and advocate for wise use attended, reflecting the importance planning plays in the health of the estuary.

WA Science Ambassador, Professor Lyn Beazley officially launched the ‘Wetlands and People Plan’ marking the historical moment as Australia’s first Ramsar site CEPA Action Plan. Professor Beazley acknowledged the many pressures on the wetlands and the importance of wise management.

PHCC Chairman, Andy Gulliver, asked everyone to pause and enjoy the defining moment in the management of the Ramsar site, “You have to inform to inspire and then inspire to act.” Mr Gulliver said, “The PHCC and its partners have created Australia’s only site-specific stand-alone CEPA action plan under our international obligations to the Ramsar Convention. It has taken many years of persistent effort and commitment. The launch of the Plan is a watershed moment for our community. Over time it will change the way we think about and value our natural assets.”

“Thousands of jobs and billions of dollars of investment depend on the health of our waterways and wetlands”, he said. “It’s an unfortunate lesson of history that we often don’t realise what we’ve got until it’s gone. The ‘Wetlands and People Plan’ will inform the community about the true value of our wetlands. Well informed communities make better decisions.”

Natalie Goddard from Mandurah Cruises also spoke at the launch, explaining the huge economic contribution the Estuary makes to the local tourism industry, “We get to showcase this place, like nowhere else in the world, to 100,000 visitors every year. The visitors want to experience nature, the dolphins, plentiful fish and a healthy ecosystem”.

The Plan’s 4 Goals endeavour to create a brighter long-term future for the wetlands through encouraging wise-use, well-informed decision making, active stewardship and advocacy across all sectors. The Plan will also help the Australian Government meet its obligations as signatories to a number of international agreements (Ramsar, as well as the international Migratory Bird Agreements with Japan, China & the Republic of Korea – JAMBA, CAMBA & ROKAMBA).

PHCC CEO, Jane O’Malley added some local context, “We purposely launched the Wetlands and People Plan on the 1st of November, the opening of the Crab season. In doing so we celebrated the reason for the two-month closure to crabbing; wise-use to protect the breeding stock. This means that crabbing will be a recreational opportunity for this and future generations. This is part of the reason the fishery has gained Marine Stewardship Accreditation for both the recreational and commercial crab fishery.”

In his closing statement, Mr Gulliver stated, “During the development of the Plan a comment was made that, “As amazing as the Peel-Yalgorup Ramsar site is, it is astounding that our community and political leaders know so little about it”– we have great faith that working with our partners to implement the Plan this will no longer be the case.”

The creative spirit of the Waugal is believed to be responsible for the creation of rivers, lakes and wetlands and also a protector of the environment, a fitting reminder of the cultural significance of the Peel-Yalgorup Wetland System. In a poignant conclusion to the launch, Franklyn Nannup under Elder Harry Nannup’s guidance invited those in attendance to walk to the water’s edge, take a handful of sand and cast it into the water in a form of greeting to the Waugal, to assure the spirit we were there to do no harm, but here to help.

 

ENDS

Media Contact:  Jane O’Malley, Chief Executive Officer, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, Jane.Omalley@peel-harvey.org.au, (08) 6369 8800

 

We acknowledge the Noongar people as Traditional Custodians of this land and pay our respects to all Elders past and present

 

The Lake Clifton Festival, a Natural Success

1 December 2017…The Lake Clifton Festival attracted visitors from near and far to celebrate the natural wonders of the area. Held at Cape Bouvard Winery and with Yalgorup National Park as the backdrop, it was the perfect setting to showcase the area’s unique attractions in and around Lake Clifton.

Lake Clifton is one of the most valuable natural assets of the Peel region and provides habitat for numerous migratory and resident shorebird species. The lake is also home to living Thrombolites; a striking population of calcareous rock-like structures in the lake formed by microbial colonies over thousands of years. The 26,500 hectare Peel-Yalgorup wetland system, including Lake Clifton and other lakes in the Yalgorup National Park, are designated wetlands of international importance under the Ramsar Convention (Ramsar Site 482).

In hosting the festival, the City of Mandurah and Peel-Harvey Catchment Council were able to highlight the significance and value of Lake Clifton, entice new visitors to the area, bring the local community together and announce future events designed to promote and protect this very special area. The festival was well received with over 150 visitors who enjoyed free activities such as Noongar cultural tours, bird talks, possum and wildflower workshops and the Land for Wildlife interactive stall.

Ornithologist, Bill Rutherford, was on hand to talk about the many ways the local community can get involved in bird-watching. Bill shared his knowledge on how to use bird-watching equipment and talked about bird species that migrate from Siberia and Asia each year to feed on the mudflats of the Peel-Yalgorup Wetland.

George and Leanne Walley, from Mandjoogoordap Dreaming, led guided cultural tours to the Thrombolites (Woggaal’s Noorook) of Lake Clifton. The Walk and Talk tours took visitors on “a journey with George” discovering the cultural significance of Lake Clifton whilst learning about life on country, bush medicine and local dreamtime stories.

The PHCC Land for Wildlife stall offered kids the chance to build a Land for Wildlife model, transforming an empty paddock model into a wildlife habitat for crazy critter creations. The Land for Wildlife stall was a great opportunity to promote the area’s new PHCC Land for Wildlife program funded by the City of Mandurah and Shire of Waroona.

The City of Mandurah Mayor, Rhys Williams said the Lake Clifton Festival was a fantastic way to bring the local community together to celebrate the iconic and beautiful water body of Lake Clifton and its surroundings, “We know our environment is so important and this area is truly special.  It’s steeped in dreamtime mythology and home to the largest lake-bound thrombolite reef in the southern hemisphere which is recognised under the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands of International Significance,” he said.

PHCC Chair, Andy Gulliver was delighted with the efforts of the City of Mandurah and PHCC in bringing the festival to fruition, “It was great to see this festival bring together residents and environmental and community groups, providing them with an opportunity to exchange stories, share information and work together to help protect the lake and its environment.”

The Lake Clifton Festival is the first of many activities planned in the Lake Clifton Catchment. The City of Mandurah and PHCC will continue to work on a range of events and activities over the coming spring and summer months including the Bird and Wildflower ‘Walk and Talks’ and the very popular Night Stalks.

For more information please visit the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council website at

http://www.peel-harvey.org.au/

 

This project is supported by funding from the Western Australian Government’s State NRM Program and The Australian Government’s National Landcare Program.

ENDS

Media Contact:  Jane O’Malley, Chief Executive Officer, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, Jane.Omalley@peel-harvey.org.au, (08) 6369 8800

We acknowledge the Noongar people as Traditional Custodians of this land and pay our respects to all Elders past and present

Close of Office

The PHCC office will be closed from 23 December 2016 to 3 January 2017.

We wish you a Merry Christmas and a happy New Year.

PHCC Submission to Draft South Metropolitan Peel Sub-Regional Planning Framework

 

 

Peel-Harvey Catchment Council have prepared this Submission to the Draft South Metropolitan Peel Sub-Regional Planning Framework:

Click here to view or print pdf …

We appreciate the opportunity to provide a submission on this major Plan.

 

 

Are You Our New Community Member?

 

A Community seat is available on the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council (PHCC) Board.

The Peel-Harvey Catchment Council is an incorporated, not-for-profit, community based natural resource management (NRM) organisation that promotes an integrated approach to catchment management and the way we protect and restore the environment within the Peel-Harvey catchment.

If you have an understanding of ecological principles, knowledge and experience with natural resource management, then you may be just who we are looking for.

Click here to download the self-assessment and nomination form.

Written nominations to be received by 10am Wednesday 16 September 2015.

For the PHCC Constitution, click here.

S.H.A.R.E. Speakers Flock To Mandurah

7 July 2015…The topic of next week’s Peel-Harvey Catchment Council’s event, S.H.A.R.E. (Social Help, Action & Resources for Environment) has drawn Western Australia’s leading experts on planning, urban design and sustainability to Mandurah. S.H.A.R.E.’s topic, ‘Dry Sheep Equivalent (DSE)’, relates to planning for landscape capacity. DSE is a standard agricultural stocking measure of a piece of land’s capacity to carry livestock. With many strategic planning projects underway in the Peel-Harvey region, the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council invited the experts to address how we will enable world class innovative planning, manage population growth to 3.5 million for Perth and Peel, and protect the region’s significant environmental assets. The guest speakers are:

Peter Newman, Professor of Sustainability, Curtin University ‘What is the Peel-Harvey’s DSE in human terms and how is planning addressing this?’; Brett Wood-Gush, Urban Designer/ Fellow Planning Institute of Australia ‘Packing them in: Why suburbia is becoming eco-burbia like it or not’; Simon Taylor, Director at Department of the Premier and Cabinet of WA ‘SAPPR – The strategic planning for land use and long term conservation planning’; Rebecca Eggleston, General Manager, FORM ‘Creating vibrant, diverse, quality places designed with people in mind’; and Debra Goostrey, CEO UDIA WA ‘Dispelling urban myths to ensure world class liveability for Perth and Peel in 2050’.

S.H.A.R.E. ‘Dry Sheep Equivalent’ is being held Thursday 16th July. Seats are strictly limited and RSVP is essential. Enquiries to catchment.events@peel-harvey.org.au

SPEAKER PROFILES

Peter Newman 2015 Final

Peter Newman

Peter Newman is the Professor of Sustainability at Curtin University. He has written 17 books but is best known in Perth as a media commentator and the person who saved the Fremantle Railway. In 2014 he was awarded an Order of Australia for his contributions to urban design and sustainable transport. Peter has worked in local government as an elected councillor, in state government as an advisor to three Premiers, in the Australian Government on the Board of Infrastructure Australia and in the UN on the IPCC as a Lead Author for Transport. (Pre-recorded presentation).

Brett Wood-Gush Final

Brett Wood-Gush

Brett is the Principal Urban Designer at Metropolitan Redevelopment Authority where, among other current projects, he closely involved in the Scarborough Beach Masterplan Development. He has been engaged in multiple projects as senior urban designer and has developed strategy and policy recommendations and industry workshops. A passionate and focused collaborator, lecturer and researcher, Brett is a skilled practitioner in creating viable, vibrant and sustainable communities.

 

Simon Taylor Final

Simon Taylor

Simon is currently a Director in the Cabinet and Policy Division at the Department of Premier and Cabinet. In this role he leads two major cross government projects: The Strategic Assessment of the Perth and Peel regions (the ‘SAPPR’) and The Kimberley Science and Conservation Strategy. Simon holds a Bachelor of Laws and Bachelor of Arts (majoring in sustainable development) and has previously worked in the Offices of the Ministers for Environment and Planning. Prior to this he also worked at the Department of Housing on a number of affordable housing projects and helped to establish the Perth Solar Cities project.

 

Rebecca Eggleston_Headshot Colour

Rebecca Eggleston

Rebecca is General Manager at FORM, an independent non-profit organization that develops and leverages creativity as a catalyst for community transformation and cultural development in Western Australia. Rebecca leads the organisation’s urban and place strategy work, combining her background in creative cities, city strategy, creative industries and community development. Rebecca was previously a Program Director at CEOs for Cities, a U.S. based national network of urban leaders, where she developed the organisation’s creative cities work and consulting, as well as designing and delivering new programs and national events to advance thinking on a range of key city concerns. Prior to this, she managed creative industry and creative city development initiatives in Western Australia.

Debra Goostrey Final

Debra Goostrey

Debra has held the position of Chief Executive Officer for the WA Branch of the Urban Development Institute of Australia, the peak body for the development industry since May 2007. After studying for a double degree in Public Administration & Information Science, Debra had a varied career representing the interests of private industry and held the key role of Chief Executive Officer for Transport Forum prior to taking up the position at UDIA. Debra’s broad understanding of the needs of industry has seen her involvement on an enormous variety of committees, councils and boards at state and national level including diverse roles as a Trustee Director for a multi-billion dollar industry superannuation fund, Director of the Land Surveyors Licensing Board and a member of the Wildlife Corridors Advisory Group reporting to the Federal Minster for Environment. Debra is currently a member of the Training Accreditation Council, the Ministerial Taskforce on Housing Affordability, the Perth/Peel Strategic Assessment Reference Group and is Chair of the School of Economics and Finance at Curtin University.

ENDS

Media Contact: Jane O’Malley, Chief Executive Officer, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, Jane.Omalley@peel-harvey.org.au , (08) 6369 8800

EPA Flight Inspects Peel-Harvey

 Group at Goegerup Lake

    Peel-Harvey Catchment Council escorted the Environmental Protection Authority Board on an aerial inspection of the Coastal portion of the Peel-Harvey Catchment. L-R Elizabeth Carr, Jane O’Malley, Dr Paul Vogel, Jan Star A.M, Glen McLeod, Dr Tom Hatton and Robert Harvey

2 July 2015…Gaining first-hand knowledge of the state of health of the large Peel-Harvey catchment was the goal of an aerial site inspection by members of the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) board this week.

The flight was part of a day long visit organised by the Office of the EPA, with the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council (PHCC), acting as guides. The PHCC is the community based organisation responsible for the natural resource management of the large 11, 940 km2 catchment.

PHCC Chair, Jan Star A.M. said that as part of the Strategic Assessment for the Perth and Peel Region (SAPPR), the EPA board were interested in observing the issues the catchment is facing to help inform how to manage population growth and protect the environment which is the economic base of this region.

“The flight gave them a bird’s eye view of the complexities of our waterways that cannot be appreciated from the ground,” said Jan Star. “On-ground inspections included Lake Goegrup, Austin Cove, Ravenswood, the Murray River, and the Peel Main Drain. We also visited the C-Wise facility at Nambeelup and discussed opportunities for closed loop food production. There are good opportunities for us to enable sound planning and protection of our environmental values, which underpin why we live and recreate in the Peel-Harvey, but we can’t take a business-as-usual approach. I think everyone appreciated this and hence the focus on the Peel-Harvey through the SAPPR process.”

“Science is showing us that our waterways are in a bad way. We can see some of the impacts; others are more subtle. With increased population will come increased pressures, we need to be clever about how and where we put people, and the services to support them. We were very pleased to have the opportunity to talk about the need to protect our fragile environment and focus on solutions for the future. “

Environmental Protection Authority Chairman Dr Paul Vogel said the aerial and ground tours across various sites of the Peel-Harvey area, accompanied by the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council and experts from the Department of Water, proved invaluable to the board members.

“The site visit was an opportunity to get a first-hand look at the area and provide the EPA with a better understanding of the issues and pressures facing the Peel-Harvey system,” Dr Vogel said. “The EPA found the site visit extremely useful in informing our views.”

ENDS

Media Contact: Jane O’Malley, Chief Executive Officer, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, Jane.Omalley@peel-harvey.org.au , (08) 6369 8800

River Plans Highlight Landcare Priorities

MurrayRAP_JoGarvey (16)

Photo: Peel-Harvey Catchment Council Project Officer Jo Garvey with the river action plan which establishes priorities for the mid Murray River reaches.

22 June 2015:   Key natural resource management issues for the Murray River are under careful consideration thanks to a major review of the river’s action plans. The river action plans (RAPS) are significant documents which set priority Landcare works for the mid reaches of the Murray. They have been developed by the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council (PHCC) in partnership with the Shire of Murray with the support of the Department of Water and the local community.

PHCC chair, Jan Star A.M. said the two newly released RAPs for the lower and middle reaches of the Murray River assessed and quantified results of previous river action plans prepared in 2003 and 2008, and had identified improvements.

“The Murray River’s health needs our focus and attention. Bank degradation has been attributed to boat wash, lack of native vegetation and stock access. These 2014/15 RAPs show an increase in vegetation and a decrease in bank erosion in some sections of the riverbanks where Landcare restoration works such as river bank stabilisation, fencing and revegetation have been undertaken,” said Jan Star.

The Peel-Harvey Catchment Council is continuing to work on priority natural resource management issues along the Murray River, most recently in repairing riparian corridors to provide habitats and food for native wildlife under their large Rivers 2 Ramsar biodiversity project.

The Shire of Murray is supportive of the Peel Harvey Catchment Council (PHCC) and its extensive restoration efforts as part of the Rivers 2 Ramsar Project.

“The Shire has had significant involvement with the PHCC in implementing the Lower Murray River Action Plan, undertaking tree planting efforts, weed management measures and cockatoo workshops,” said Chief Executive Officer Dean Unsworth.

This project is supported by the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council through funding from the Australian Government.

MORE ON RIVERS 2 RAMSAR…

The Australian Government has committed over $3.5 million to restore ecological corridors across the Peel-Harvey catchment to re-establish habitats for native fauna. The project, named Rivers 2 Ramsar to reflect the linkage between the region’s rivers and Ramsar-listed wetlands, is occurring concurrently across six priority sites in the 11,940km catchment.

Community-based natural resource management (NRM) organisation, The Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, is managing the delivery of the over-arching project with no less than seven key partners, numerous stakeholders and community members.

The large scale biodiversity project is on schedule to finish in 2017 and is having significant social, economic and environmental benefits.
ENDS
Media Contact: Jane O’Malley, Chief Executive Officer, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, Jane.Omalley@peel-harvey.org.au , (08) 6369 8800

Team Effort for Landcare Results

Wilgie Ck Green Army PHCC Hero (2) Low Res

Community members, together with Bridging the Gap’s Green Army team and the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, are achieving major revegetation works at Wilgie Creek.

10 June 2015 – Momentum continues this month with major Landcare works on the region’s largest biodiversity project, Rivers 2 Ramsar, being rolled out along the Murray River by members of the Bridging the Gap Green Army, community volunteers and the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council (PHCC).

The teamwork is creating large scale improvements like this section of revegetation at Wilgie Creek where over 900 seedlings were planted over a hectare of land. This project is supported by the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme. PHCC Chair, Jan Star A.M. said the Wilgie Creek revegetation was an excellent example of community Landcare actions.
“The Rivers 2 Ramsar project is about improving the connections between local bushland and rivers like the Murray and repairing these riparian corridors to provide habitats and food for native wildlife. By working with our project partners, community members and the Bridging the Gap Green Army, we have been able to achieve and even surpass the project’s revegetation benchmarks,” said Jan Star.

Mr Don Randall, MP for Canning, said it was great to see this level of cooperation, support and commitment from the local community, Green Army teams and Landcare sector.

“The new relationship between Bridging the Gap and Peel-Harvey Catchment Council will ensure ongoing environmental benefits for my electorate of Canning. The Coalition Government’s commitment of over $3.5 million to the Peel-Harvey region will ensure that the unique environment is protected for future generations,” he said.

Through the engagement of partners such as the Shire of Murray and support from the Department of Water and community groups like the North Yunderup Community Association and Friends of Rivers Peel, over 37 hectares of weed control and 20 hectares of revegetation has been undertaken around the Murray River, which is one of six sites throughout the Peel-Harvey catchment where the Rivers 2 Ramsar project is creating large scale landscape improvements.

MORE ON RIVERS 2 RAMSAR…

The Australian Government has committed over $3.5 million to restore ecological corridors across the Peel-Harvey catchment to re-establish habitats for native fauna. The project, named Rivers 2 Ramsar to reflect the linkage between the region’s rivers and Ramsar-listed wetlands, is occurring concurrently across six priority sites in the 11,940km catchment.

Landscape linkages such as this are significant not only for resident fauna but here in the Peel-Harvey our rivers flow into the Ramsar-listed wetlands which are an important feeding and roosting site for many of the migratory birds that visit from Siberia, Japan, Korea and China.

Community-based natural resource management (NRM) organisation, The Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, is managing the delivery of the over-arching project with no less than seven key partners, numerous stakeholders and community members.

The large scale biodiversity project is on schedule to finish in 2017 and is having significant social, economic and environmental benefits. This project is supported by the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council through funding from the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme.
ENDS
Media Contact: Jane O’Malley, Chief Executive Officer, Peel-Harvey Catchment Council, Jane.Omalley@peel-harvey.org.au , (08) 6369 8800

Binjareb Boodja Landscapes 2025 – Commonwealth News Release

The Hon. Greg Hunt with Don Randall MP, Jane O'Malley, Jan Star, George Walley and Harry Nannup at the launch of Binjareb Boodja Landscapes 2025.

The Hon. Greg Hunt with Don Randall MP, Jane O’Malley, Jan Star, George Walley and Harry Nannup at the launch of Binjareb Boodja Landscapes 2025.

The joint media announcement from the Hon. Greg Hunt MP and Don Randall MP last week, Binjareb Boodja Landscapes 2025, made the Commonwealth’s media releases – you can review it in the link below:

AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT MEDIA RELEASE SERVICE
***************************************************************

TITLE: Blueprint to protect natural and social values of Peel-Harvey – media release 1 May 2015
PORTFOLIO: Environment
URL: http://www.environment.gov.au/minister/hunt/2015/mr20150501.html
SNIPPET: Minister for the Environment. The regional strategy brings together the most recent scientific and community knowledge about the natural and social values of the Peel-Harvey catchment, Minister Hunt said. | Minister for the Environment | Parliamentary Secretary | Archives |.

Click here to view or print pdf …

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